Christine Lindemer | Groton Real Estate, Lunenburg Real Estate, Westford Real Estate


Are you conscious of your environment? Fact is, almost every kitchen is causing some level of harm to the environment, no matter how environmentally-conscious the homeowner. That being said there are things you can do to "go green" and reduce your negative environmental impact.Here some ways to go green in your kitchen, at no additional cost.

Wash dishes the "Green" way

The method you adopt when it comes to washing your dishes determines how much water you use. Before you use your dishwasher, wait till you have a full load in it, not just one meal or days worth. The water used to run a partially filled dishwasher is the same as to wash one full load, so by combining multiple meals and days of dishes, you can cut your water usage in half or even further.

Most dishwashers come with an ‘economy' button option. Turning it on will save your energy and water. Another thing to look out for is the ‘heat dry' option. Turn it off and air-dry your dishes instead. That will save tons of energy for you.

Cook smart

The conventional oven consumes 50% more power compared to the microwave oven. If you are going to cook small dishes, use the microwave oven instead, or maybe the toaster oven or slow cooker.Using a microwave oven also brings less heat into the home, thereby needing less air-conditioning.

Fridge usage

Browsing through the fridge, keeping the door open for long is one of the ridiculous ways to waste energy. Also, make sure that your refrigerator is not leaking cold air due to a faulty seal. If that is the case, then it is time to get the seal repaired.

Keep recycling

Find out what in your home can be recycled and how to get them to your local recycling facilities. In most regions, the recycling company goes door to door to pick them up, just like they do your trash cans. So, always get those recyclables in your kitchen out for the recycling service to pick them up.

Products with less packaging

It is not easy to altogether avoid food packaging, but you can start from little and work your way up. Avoid buying products with excessive packaging. Instead of buying them individually, buy large sizes of products.

Going green in your kitchen is a practice that would benefit you tremendously. Apart from the money saved from less usage of energy and water, you help make the environment less polluted and more friendly. It's time to start building and working through a checklist of things to keep your kitchen green. You will be grateful you did.


In this quick, got to have it now society, the microwave is the go-to for a quick cup of tea or to reheat that coffee. But does it give a satisfying, refreshing cup? Some people believe that water heated in a kettle is hotter and stays hotter longer, so it brews a better cup of tea.

What does the science say?

Personal experience notwithstanding, the scientific community seems to be in agreement that water heated in a microwave to boiling is the same temperature as water brought to boiling on the stove. And, that once in the cup, the cooling rate is the same. There is some speculation that the kettle heats water more uniformly than the microwave, resulting in certain parts, especially in the center, cooling faster because they had not reached the same temperature as the rest of the cup.

Others contend that the heated kettle allows the water to remain hotter while the microwaved container immediately begins to convey the higher temperature away from the heated water. For this reason, microwavable packaging often instructs to stir or let stand for a specified time so that the heat transfers evenly throughout the dish.

And then there are the folks that claim the perfect cup of tea comes from microwaving your tea leaves or tea bag in the water rather than pouring the water over the tea after it has heated. Some studies conclude that boiling the leaves in the microwave extracts more of the nutritional compounds than traditional brewing methods. 

What about nature?

Well, yes, heating the water over a flame has a satisfying earthiness about it. The act of filling the kettle, lighting the burner, waiting for the steam to build up a head so the kettle will whistle … all of that adds to the mystique of the brew. During the waiting, you're already relaxing. Then, you have a few moments more to be mindful as you pour the boiling water over loose tea or tea bag and watch as the tendrils of color begin to flow through your cup.

By the time you sit down and take a sip, you've already relaxed so the tea's catechins and warm steaminess can work their magic on your soul. Then, once you've rested, the caffeine slides into your senses to perk you back up so that you can move forward in the day and accomplish more.

Whatever side you’re on, you can find the perfect kettle to brew your stovetop experience or try a borosilicate glass teapot made for the microwave to create your ideal cuppa!

And if you need a new kitchen to support your tea habit, ask your local real estate agent to show you some options.


Humans have used herbs to season foods for thousands of years. While the most obvious benefit to using herbs is added flavor they are also packed with vitamins, nutrients, and antioxidants. Fresh herbs are even more nutritious and flavorful than their dried out counterparts lining grocery store shelves. We may think of dried out herb to be more convenient but with a little preparation, you can have access to fresh herbs in your home year long! Here’s how to create more flavorful, healthier dishes on the cheap without stepping into the seasoning aisle at the store: Know your directions - knowing which windows are facing north, south, east, and west will set you up for success. The direction your window is facing will determine how well a plant will do there as you will have a guideline as to how much sun that window receives each day. Each plant has it’s own sunlight requirements and knowing how much sunlight is coming through each window will make it easier for you to know which plants will do best in your home. Most herb plants prefer around six hours of sunlight a day and will do well in a southern facing window. You will also want to make sure your plants stay warm and are not in a draft or if in a window, are not directly touching a windowpane. Pick your pots - Choose pots that have drain holes as most herbs will require moist, but not drenched, soil. Other than that, feel free to get creative with your potting arrangements! This is a great way to add a little decorative interest to a room, so whether you choose a uniquely shaped pot or roll up your sleeves for a little DIY paint project! Pick your plants - To create your year round supply of herbs look for plants that tout labels of “evergreen” and “hardy.” Plants to look for are chives, mint, cilantro, bay leaves, rosemary, sage, dill, parsley, and lavender. Many of these plants have the added bonus of throwing off wonderful smells so along with fresh seasonings for your cooking you will also have a natural air freshener! Keep in mind that opting for starter plants will get your indoor herb garden rolling along much more quickly than starting with seeds. Maintenance - When a plant has reached about 6 inches start to cut off around one-third the herbs every so often to use for cooking and maintain a healthy plant. If you cut off any more than one-third you will put your plant at risk of dying. To create an evenly growing plant, turn it every week or so. While starting an indoor herb garden takes a bit of time and investment to get started the benefits will far outweigh the minimal effort they require. You will not only have more flavorful herbs to season your home cooked meals with, but also plants that throw off a pleasant aroma and add more visual interest to your home!